Smoky Mushroom and Black Rice Sushi

Smoky Mushroom and Black Rice Sushi (via abeautifulmess.com)I’m back with more homemade sushi – you can see some other rolls I’ve made this year here and here. But even if you are not a sushi fan or don’t see yourself going to the trouble of making sushi at home, I would still recommend you stick around to hear about the mushrooms that go inside this roll. They are smoky, sweet and just super flavorful. They would be amazing on top of a burger, in a grilled cheese sandwich, or maybe even on top of pasta. In a way, I think they almost taste similar to bacon (but not EXACTLY, just similar), so really anything you would add bacon to would probably work well with these mushrooms.

Smoky Mushroom and Black Rice Sushi (via abeautifulmess.com) Bacon sushi doesn’t sound all that appetizing to me, but I promise these are delicious! The smoky mushrooms are paired with avocado and thinly sliced sour apples with a thin radish slice on top. You get a little smoke, you get a little sweetness, add some crunch, and we’re in business!

I experimented with using black rice (sometimes called forbidden rice) in place of traditional sushi rice just to add some extra nutrition and also color. But if you have a big bag of sushi rice already in your pantry, you certainly could substitute.

Forbidden riceSmoky Mushroom and Black Rice Sushi, makes 4-5 (maki) rolls, serves 2 as a meal

6 oz. portobello mushrooms (approx. 5-6 baby bellos)
1 scant tablespoon liquid smoke
1 tablespoon soy sauce (or Tamari)
2 tablespoons maple syrup
salt and pepper
1 cup black rice + 1 3/4 cups water
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar (or rice wine vinegar)
1/2 granny smith apple
1 avocado
4-5 sheets of nori (or soy wrappers)
2 large radishes
soy sauce, wasabi paste, and pickled ginger for serving

Wash and slice the mushrooms into thin strips. In a small bowl, stir together the liquid smoke, soy sauce, and maple syrup. Add the mushrooms to a ziplock bag with the sauce. Seal and toss so everything gets coated well. Allow to sit for at least two hours or overnight (or during the day while you’re at work, etc.).

Smoky marinated mushrooms Bacon mushroomsCheck the rice package for directions and begin cooking the rice. This will probably take around 30 minutes.

In the meantime, cook the mushrooms with any remaining marinade in a nonstick pan over medium/high heat for 8-12 minutes. Season with a little salt and pepper. You want the excess liquid to be bubbling some as this cooks. It’s going to seem quite soupy at first, but as it cooks the liquid will reduce until nearly gone and all that remains are cooked mushrooms with a thick sauce coating. Remove to a plate.

Once the rice is cooked, remove to a bowl and cover with plastic wrap. If you notice any excess liquid as you transfer it from pot to bowl, go ahead and gently tip over your sink to remove that. Allow to sit covered for 10 minutes. You don’t want the rice to dry out but letting it sit will help it get a little more sticky. Then stir in the vinegar.

Slice the sour apple and avocado very thin. Now on a sushi rolling mat, or a kitchen towel lined with plastic wrap, place a sheet of nori. Top with rice and spread into a thin layer. The rice should be sticky but not as sticky as sushi rice. That’s OK – it will still roll up nicely. Then add mushrooms, apple, and avocado. Then roll up. Continue until you’ve used all the rice. Then slice each roll into pieces.

By the way, I have it on my list to make a sushi rolling video for you guys sometime, as I feel that would be both fun to make and probably helpful to link when I share these posts. So I promise that is coming – hopefully sooner rather than later. 🙂

Smoky Mushroom and Black Rice Sushi (via abeautifulmess.com) Clean the radishes and slice very thin. I think a mandoline works best here. Top each piece with a thin slice of radish just before serving. Happy at-home sushi making! -Emma

Credits // Author and Photography: Emma Chapman

  • Yum, I adore mushrooms and need more seaweed in my diet (we use only sea salt and Himalayan salt but that means I need my iodine from other sources). Also I think that last picture is the best of your food photography. At least my personal favorite style 😉

  • The word “umami” is practically defined by mushroom. That savory mouthfeel of satisfaction is why I heart them so much. I’m so excited to try this out. Thanks Emma!

  • I would like to unsubscribe from the Beautiful Mess blog. I think I’m a bit old for your style (71) and probably not your target group. I do love craft projects and always have some sewing in progress, I make cards, bunting, and am forever changing my house, and have enjoyed some of your ideas. So, thanks for the memories, and time to move on.
    Thanks,
    Jude Nuttall
    New Zealand