Mashed Beets and Potatoes

I hope this doesn’t seem like “weird food” to you because it was actually probably one of the most popular side dishes at our Friendsgiving this year! Not only was it a crowd-pleaser, it is extremely easy to make. So I guess it’s a host-pleaser too. You basically just throw the ingredients in your crockpot (or slow cooker, it’s often called both) and then mash things up just before serving. So easy that it feels like cheating!

And as you can probably tell, these aren’t your average mashed potatoes. I took my basic Slow Cooker Mashed Potatoes and swapped out some of the potatoes for beets. Then I pumped up the flavor by adding some crumbled goat cheese—I just love beets paired with goat cheese! These are not only delicious but bonus points because the mixture turns out a gorgeous PINK.

And if having a pink side dish doesn’t excite you … well, I’m not sure why you’re even reading this blog. We are kind of all about the pink. 🙂

Mashed Beets and Potatoes, serves 6-8 as a side

4 lbs russet potatoes, peeled and cut into large cubes
1 lb beets, tops and roots removed and peeled
1 1/2 cups vegetable stock or water
1/4 cup butter
1 cup crumbled goat cheese
1/2 cup milk
salt + pepper
chives to garnish

First, peel and cube the potatoes and beets. Throw them in the slow cooker with the vegetable stock (or water) and butter. Cut the butter into small cubes before adding. Cover and cook on high for 4 hours and 30 minutes.

Once the cook time is up, mash the potatoes and beets. I used a potato masher. You could also use an immersion blender, potato ricer, etc. But I think the masher is the easiest option.

Add half of the goat cheese and milk and stir to combine. If it still seems too thick to you, add more milk until you get the consistency you prefer. Taste and add as much salt and pepper as you think it needs.

Then top the final dish with the remaining goat cheese and some fresh chives—then you’re ready to go! See? Told you it was too easy. xo. Emma

Credits // Author: Emma Chapman. Photography: Elise Randolph. Photos edited with ACS for Desktop.
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Mashed Beets and Potatoes

Servings 8

Ingredients

  • 4 lbs russet potatoes peeled and cut into large cubes
  • 1 lb beets tops and roots removed and peeled
  • 1 1/2 cups vegetable stock or water
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1 cup crumbled goat cheese
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • salt + pepper
  • chives to garnish

Instructions

  1. First, peel and cube the potatoes and beets. Throw them in the slow cooker with the vegetable stock (or water) and butter. Cut the butter into small cubes before adding. Cover and cook on high for 4 hours and 30 minutes.

  2. Once the cook time is up, mash the potatoes and beets. I used a potato masher. You could also use an immersion blender, potato ricer, etc. But I think the masher is the easiest option.
  3. Add half of the goat cheese and milk and stir to combine. If it still seems too thick to you, add more milk until you get the consistency you prefer. Taste and add as much salt and pepper as you think it needs. Then top the final dish with the remaining goat cheese and some fresh chives.

  • I would try this with golden beets! The color would be buttery and golden.

    Golden beets are a bit sweeter and less earthy tasting than red beets. 🙂

    • The butter and milk can easily be swapped out for nondairy versions of each. The goat cheese adds a good amount of flavor here and I am not sure of an exact nondairy substitution. You could try some nondairy cream cheese or yogurt and add more fresh herbs or spices to give it a bit more of a kick (in the flavor department). That would be pretty easy and although I think the final flavor would be different, it would still be very creamy and delicious.

  • I’ve been looking for some good beet recipes…this looks like a great way to incorporate them! I may even try this with sweet potatoes instead of white (easier for me to digest and better for blood sugar). Thanks for this creative recipe…can’t wait to try it!

    • Yes, these would all work. It will change the texture some, but I doubt it will make that big of a difference overall. The varieties you mentioned tend to be a bit smaller, so be sure to use similar amounts to what the recipe calls for. You will probably have to spend a little more time peeling too (since they are smaller, more skin/surface area).

      You can leave the peels on if you wash/scrub them well to remove dirt. But this will leave your final texture much less silky smooth, but the skins of these varieties (over russet) tend to be thinner and less chewy anyway so it’s an option if you want to try it.

  • Hi!

    I’m interested in gifting your Weekday, Weekend cookbook to a friend of mine, but she doesn’t eat dairy. Would you say that the majority of recipes in the book either do not have dairy, have easy dairy substitutes (butter for applesauce, etc) or use cheese as a topping which is easily left off? I’d love to get your general opinion on whether it’s a good option for someone with that dietary restriction. Thanks!
    Amy

    • Hi Amy! Most of the cookbook includes recipes that don’t include dairy, refined sugars, or white flour, but there’s some splurge recipes too! 🙂

  • just made these for thxgiving and they were a hit, perfectly chunky and creamy and the goat cheese kept everything from being too sweet from the beets!