Wild Rice and Mushroom Risotto Soup

What do we want? SOUP! When do we want it? ALL WINTER!

Just imagine me doing this call and response to myself at my house for the next few months. It’s basically my anthem. Most of the day you can find me either drinking hot tea or eating some kind of hot soup. I am considering it self care this time of year when the weather is frigid and I regret loving houses with high ceilings (draft city!).

If you’re soup obsessed like me, this is a good one. This wild rice and mushroom risotto soup is vegetable based with some whole grains thrown in as well. It’s brothy but still manages to be creamy and super filling. If you want to throw some shredded chicken or sautéed shrimp in there, I wouldn’t blame you. This is simply the soup version of one of my favorite things to make at home—risotto.

This wild rice and mushroom risotto soup is made of mostly simple, whole ingredients. I do add some dairy (but see the recipe notes below for possible changes/omissions if you need) and there is wine in this soup. I love the slight yeasty taste that cooking with wine adds to dishes. Plus major bonus points if you have already opened a bottle of wine to make this soup. Well, you might as well have a glass too. 🙂

You could absolutely change up some of the vegetables in this soup in case you have other veggies you need to use up. Soup is always an excellent way to use up leftover vegetables. Enjoy and stay warm, friends! xo. Emma

Wild Rice and Mushroom Risotto Soup

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 small shallots
  • 1 orange or red bell pepper
  • 3-4 cloves of garlic
  • 1-2 large portobello mushroom caps
  • 1 cup wild rice
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 4 cups vegetable or chicken stock
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoons whole milk or cream
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese
  • 2-3 tablespoons chopped herbs like chives and parsley
  • salt and pepper

Instructions

  1. Chop the shallots, bell pepper, and mushrooms into small pieces. Mince the garlic. In a large pot over medium to high heat, melt the butter and olive oil together and lightly season with salt and pepper. Add the shallots and bell pepper and cook for 2-3 minutes until beginning to soften. Stir in the mushrooms and garlic and cook another minute.

  2. Then stir in the rice and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Add the wine and continue to cook uncovered on high heat for another 2 minutes. Then add the stock and bay leaves. Turn the heat down to low, cover and allow to cook for 45-50 minutes until rice is tender. Stir occasionally.

  3. Uncover, remove the bay leaves, and allow to cook for another 5-6 minutes so the soup reduces just a little. During this time, in a small bowl whisk together the cornstarch and milk. Stir this into the soup and allow to thicken. Just before serving, stir in the Parmesan cheese and herbs and season with a little more salt and pepper as needed.

Recipe Notes

You can substitute the butter for more oil, the milk for a non-dairy milk, and simply skip the Parmesan or use a non-dairy alternative if you want to avoid dairy. I like to use a white wine in this, usually a chardonnay.

Credits // Author and Photography: Emma Chapman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.
  • This is my kind of soup! Nice and hearty with lots of umami flavors. I just need to pick up shallots and this will be dinner Wednesday. Thank you!

  • This looks great, and I’m looking forward to trying the recipe. What kind of rice blend are you using? From the recipe photos, it’s definitely not 100% wild rice. The blend looks like it would create some beautiful variety in texture and flavor! Thanks.

  • This is quite helpful. Being in self isolation quite a distance from home, I inevitably needed a culinary companion. This site has been the guide I so much needed. Cooking rice is the combination of art and science. I sometimes see chefs sprinkling salt and olive oil when preparing rice, what’s your take on this?
    And would you get the same results if you used short or medium grain variety?

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