Make Your Own Rope Rug

a teal kitchen with white cabinets and tan countertops with a black and gray circle rope rug on a black floorSoooo, remember when I shared this woven rag rug tutorial with you and I gave my solemn vow to hunt down other good rug projects? Well, I can hold my head up high because as of today I have kept that promise. No applause, please. You’re all welcome. Take a look at what some rope and fabric strips can become! We’ve got a lot of rugs in our DIY archives, but this is one of my favorite!

clothesline, fabric scissors, and 4 fabric stripsSupplies:
-1/4″ clothesline (I used three of this brand)
fabric scissors
fabric cut into 2″ wide strips (I used four different patterns and 9 yards of total fabric)
standard sewing machine

someone holding up a black and white strip of fabric in front of a sewing machineTake the beginning of your rope and wrap the end with one of your fabric strips. There’s no special way that you need to wrap the end; just make sure the tip is covered with the fabric, and then start to wrap the fabric from either right to left or left to right (depending on which is more comfortable for you if you’re right- or left-handed). Use your sewing machine to sew straight down the rope a few inches to hold the wrapped end in place. I would suggest using a heavy needle, like a jean needle, since you are sewing the rope as well as the fabric.

a black with white polka dots strip of fabric rolled up and being sewn together in a sewing machine Keeping your machine needle in the rope, continue to wrap the rope with the strip at a slight angle so you are continuing down the rope (instead of just wrapping the same spot). Once you get a foot or so of wrapped rope, sew straight down the middle of the rope until you reach the end of your wrapped rope (I put my sewing machine on the longest stitch length). Continue this process until you have 10-15′ of wrapped and sewn rope.

I switched my fabric every time I got to the end of a strip and alternated between my different patterns. Just wrap the beginning of the new strip overtop of where the old strip ends so the rope never shows through. Try and switch up the pattern rotation every so often to keep the patterns looking random overall. When you get to the end of a pack of rope, just place the beginning of a new rope right after the end of the old rope and wrap around them as you normally would. Once you sew straight down that spot, it will join them together.

someone holding a black and white strip of fabric being sewn together in a sewing machinea black with white polka dots strip of fabric being sewn to a black and white strip of fabric in a sewing machineTake the beginning end of your wrapped and sewn rope, and make a small clockwise coil. Once you coil a complete circle, use a medium to long stitch length and the widest zigzag setting to sew between the ropes and join them together. Keep turning the coil and joining new rope to the coil until you reach the end of your sewn and wrapped rope. Once you reach the end, continue the process of wrapping and sewing straight down the rope until you get another 10-15′ sewn, and then zigzag stitch that rope onto your coil. And you know what? That’s pretty much it. You just do that over and over and over until the rug is as big as you want it to be. To keep the sides from curling up as you go, try not to pull on the rope you’re joining to your rug. Just lay the rope next to the coil as you sew without either pushing or pulling on it.

Someone sewing the round black and gray rug in a sewing machineOnce the rug gets to be too big for the table your sewing machine is on, you’ll need to add another side table or desk next to your sewing machine to keep the rug flat and even with the sewing machine platform at all times (this really helps it not curve up like a giant bowl). I had to add a few books, etc., under the legs of the second table to make it the right height.

a blonde woman sewing the round black and gray rope rug with a sewing machineOnce it got too big for the desk, I moved it to the dining table and finished the process there. You can see I took a side table and put a box under it to make it the right height. Definitely a makeshift solution, but it worked! When I was done with the rug, I did still have some slight waves that wouldn’t lie flat. To fix those, I placed the rug on top of a carpet, gave the rug a good spray of water with a spray bottle, and ironed the rug with my iron on the highest steam setting. Once it felt damp with steam, I put some heavy books on the trouble areas and allowed the rug to dry. Goodbye, waves! I will say, though, if you feel the edges are getting too curled while you’re sewing, it’s best to just use a seam ripper and rip those rows out and resew them while not pulling so tight. I had to do it a few times, but it was worth it in the end. If you’re not sure if it’s getting too wavy, you can do the steam/iron trick before the rug is finished, and if the waves disappear, then you’re good; if not, you probably need to redo those rows.

To finish the rug, use your fabric strip to wrap your end of the rope similar to how you wrapped the rope at the beginning of the rug (just make sure the end of the rope is covered), and sew down the middle to secure. Using the zigzag stitch, tuck the end of the rope under your rug so it disappears from sight, and sew over it to secure. 

a blonde woman wearing a gray t-shirt, black overalls, and black high heels standing in a teal kitchen with white cabinets and tan countertops with the black and gray rope rug on a black floora close up of the black and gray circle rope rug a woman holding a cutting board with sliced papers on it walking on the black and gray circle rope ruga close up of the edge of the black and gray circle rope ruga teal kitchen with white cabinets and a tan countertops with a black and gray circle rope rug on a black floorAs you can see, I ended up with a rather sizable rug (55″ wide!). I’m actually considering continuing the rug and seeing just how big I can make it, but until I get that second wind of rug sewing strength, it’s going to hang out and look cute in our kitchen.

In case you’re wondering how long a rug like this takes, well, it all depends on how big you want to make it. It grows bigger much faster in the beginning because it doesn’t take much time to go all the way around the small coil, but the pace slows as the coil gets bigger. Thankfully, our world-class intern Alex helped me with some of the prep work so we could get this rug finished and ready to share with you as fast as possible—thanks, Alex! Just to give you an idea on how much time it takes, it took us 6 hours to make a 30″ rug, 10 hours to make a 38″ rug, 14 hours to make a 47″ rug, and 17 hours to make a 55″ rug. Of course if that sounds like too much work for you, you can always buy yourself a similar rug like this or this and I promise I won’t judge you for it 😉

Overall, I’m so happy with how this rug turned out. This is definitely a project that you come back to a few times rather than a one-day ordeal (especially if you want a bigger rug), but it’s totally worth it in my book (make sure to get something like this to go underneath!). Go get yourself some rope and cute fabric, and get sewing! xo. Laura

P.S. Check out more rugs and home decor on our wishlist and shopping pages!

Make Your Own Rope Rug

Ingredients

  • 1/4 clothesline
  • fabric scissors
  • fabric cut into 2″ wide strips I used four different patterns and 9 yards of total fabric
  • standard sewing machine

Instructions

  • Take the beginning of your rope and wrap the end with one of your fabric strips. There’s no special way that you need to wrap the end; just make sure the tip is covered with the fabric, and then start to wrap the fabric from either right to left or left to right (depending on which is more comfortable for you if you’re right- or left-handed). Use your sewing machine to sew straight down the rope a few inches to hold the wrapped end in place. I would suggest using a heavy needle, like a jean needle, since you are sewing the rope as well as the fabric.
  • Keeping your machine needle in the rope, continue to wrap the rope with the strip at a slight angle so you are continuing down the rope (instead of just wrapping the same spot). Once you get a foot or so of wrapped rope, sew straight down the middle of the rope until you reach the end of your wrapped rope (I put my sewing machine on the longest stitch length). Continue this process until you have 10-15′ of wrapped and sewn rope.
  • I switched my fabric every time I got to the end of a strip and alternated between my different patterns. Just wrap the beginning of the new strip overtop of where the old strip ends so the rope never shows through. Try and switch up the pattern rotation every so often to keep the patterns looking random overall. When you get to the end of a pack of rope, just place the beginning of a new rope right after the end of the old rope and wrap around them as you normally would. Once you sew straight down that spot, it will join them together.
  • ake the beginning end of your wrapped and sewn rope, and make a small clockwise coil. Once you coil a complete circle, use a medium to long stitch length and the widest zigzag setting to sew between the ropes and join them together. Keep turning the coil and joining new rope to the coil until you reach the end of your sewn and wrapped rope. Once you reach the end, continue the process of wrapping and sewing straight down the rope until you get another 10-15′ sewn, and then zigzag stitch that rope onto your coil. And you know what? That’s pretty much it. You just do that over and over and over until the rug is as big as you want it to be. To keep the sides from curling up as you go, try not to pull on the rope you’re joining to your rug. Just lay the rope next to the coil as you sew without either pushing or pulling on it.
  • Once the rug gets to be too big for the table your sewing machine is on, you’ll need to add another side table or desk next to your sewing machine to keep the rug flat and even with the sewing machine platform at all times (this really helps it not curve up like a giant bowl). I had to add a few books, etc., under the legs of the second table to make it the right height.
  • Once it got too big for the desk, I moved it to the dining table and finished the process there. You can see I took a side table and put a box under it to make it the right height. Definitely a makeshift solution, but it worked! When I was done with the rug, I did still have some slight waves that wouldn’t lie flat. To fix those, I placed the rug on top of a carpet, gave the rug a good spray of water with a spray bottle, and ironed the rug with my iron on the highest steam setting. Once it felt damp with steam, I put some heavy books on the trouble areas and allowed the rug to dry. Goodbye, waves! I will say, though, if you feel the edges are getting too curled while you’re sewing, it’s best to just use a seam ripper and rip those rows out and resew them while not pulling so tight. I had to do it a few times, but it was worth it in the end. If you’re not sure if it’s getting too wavy, you can do the steam/iron trick before the rug is finished, and if the waves disappear, then you’re good; if not, you probably need to redo those rows.
  • To finish the rug, use your fabric strip to wrap your end of the rope similar to how you wrapped the rope at the beginning of the rug (just make sure the end of the rope is covered), and sew down the middle to secure. Using the zigzag stitch, tuck the end of the rope under your rug so it disappears from sight, and sew over it to secure. 

Credits // Author: Laura Gummerman, Photography: Laura Gummerman and Sarah Rhodes, Project Assistant: Alex Wade. Photos edited with Stella from the Signature Collection.

 
  • This is such a great and unique idea! I love how you can make this rug to fit any space and it looks so cozy.

  • Hi! I’m just wondering how you wash the larger sized rugs?
    Beautiful!
    😊

  • Could try using thicker rope? Or even chunky yarn! Could help make the rug itself more cushy. 🙂

  • I have a question. What did you do to deal with the unfinished edges of the strips of fabric? What kept them from unraveling over time? Did you sew a finished edge before wrapping the rope?

  • This is just adorable. Have an idea to use my Spoonflower sample purchases to make one of my own – very scrappy! Thanks for a great idea! xo

  • This has been on my to make list for 5 years now, and I can’t wait to finally get started but I just now wondered if it doesnt fray too much?

  • Wow, this is beautiful, I love it and will love to try my hands on it. I think its worth the effort…List of items to get-A sewing machine…I must appreciate you for the tutorials. I am in Nigeria viewing this now and new on the DIY trend.

  • Just bought an adorable old house in a small cow town in Wyoming. I have been looking for rugs to put in the kitchen and dining room to decorate them with a farmhouse look and feel – cows, pigs, sheep, chickens, eyelet, white milk pitchers, milk cans … This rag rug tutorial is perfect for the kitchen!! My search is over! But is there a way to make one of these rag rugs into an oval shape for underneath my oval dining room table? Can’t tell you how excited I am about this rug! Thanks for sharing, girls!

  • Achei lindo,gostaria aprender em português. Grata.

  • As an experienced weaver of rag rugs I can tell you this isn’t a woven rug. It is sewn not woven.

  • I was wondering can’t you just make a tunnel with the different fabrics and put the rope inside? When your wrapping if your not stitching in the middle the whole time than where are you stitching?

  • I love this! I also adore your kitchen. Any chance you want to share your paint color info? I’m in love with it.

  • You’re machine should be fine! I just started making one again and I have had problems!!!

    1. Cut your fabric strips to 1 inch. This will allow for a tighter wrap and much easier to work with
    2. Instead of straight stitching down the middle, just go right into coiling it and attaching it with the 3 zig zag stitch (longest zig zag and 2.5-3 for stitch length) instead of sewing straight down the middle first. MUCH easier this way and you get it done much faster and it looks better!
    3. It might help to tighten the tension of your thread
    4. Release some tension on your pressure foot.

    That should help a wee bit 🙂

  • Just a heads up for anyone who is reading, You only need ONE INCH of fabric strips. 2 inches is a waste of fabric and it is MUCH harder to wrap. You can get the wrap tight with using 1 inch strips and wrapping covering half of the strip. Also, it is a HUGE overkill to sew the rug down the middle first. Huge waste of time. If you wrap the fabric around the rope tight, and pin it at the bottom, it won’t unravel and you can sew to that point. So instead of sewing down the middle then zig zagging it together, DO NEITHER. Use the 3 zig zag stitch. It makes it much more secure. Using the widest zigzag and only a 2.5-3 for the stitch length. This way you go straight into making your rug rather than having to go back and forth and back and forth between sewing it down the middle and the normal zig zig.

  • I’m going to make one of these each for my girls and one for my kitchen starting this week! I’m doing it similar to the bowls though, I’m not going to sew down the cord, just wrap and zigzag it onto itself as I’m coiling.

    I wanted to make this after I saw fabric bowls, but wasn’t sure it would work! Thanks!

  • I’ve got to be doing SOMETHING wrong because my bobbin keeps catching or over lapping or something and then I have to pull it out and cut the thread. But as soon as I thread it through the rope, IT DOES IT AGAIN! ahhh! I don’t know what to do!

  • I would Love to have this rig so beautiful wish a person coul;d print how to do it:)

  • Really nice and easy idea… a must try for everyone i should say …:)

  • Wow, that is SO beautiful! I love the texture and fabrics you used!!

  • How did you get the rope to fit in your machine? Mine is vintage and I’m not sure if I’ll be able to do it or not. I’d absolutely love to make about a billion of these!

  • My machine wont lift up high enough for me to put the rope under it. What kind of machine do u use?

  • I love it!! I’m going to make one except with a splash of red!

    http://trissab.blogspot.com/

  • Hi! I have bought the material and rope for making the project, but I’m having a real struggle with getting my sewing machine through the rope without completely shredding the stitches up (it looks like a massacre!). My machine is a very good one so I can’t work out why it is doing this…did you have that problem? I’m so excited about this project!
    Thanks for sharing, Catie

    • I’ve made all my floor mats using 6 – 10 strands of old yarn, which miraculously twists together as you wrap the material strips around it. This is a lovely soft centre for the material strips instead of rope. Oval mats are great to do, just have to start your centre part long 4” – 6” , not a tight circle like the round mats.

  • This is adorable — is there any way I could use this method to create a half circle shape?

  • Awesome project! What sewing machine is that (and do you recommend it)? Mine kicked the bucket today and the repairman said it wasn’t worth fixing – time for a new one!

  • Love those rugs!! This one is to die for… I have a couple similar in my kitchen.
    Buuuutttt…. Girl where are those Overalls from??? They are soooooo Awesome!!

  • I believe the different pattern of all the black and white fabrics makes the rug looks like stars on the floor.

  • Wow. Love this.. You rocked in making this rug..

  • I love this rug, I think I’ll try upcycling some old shirts into one. I might try making a basket with the same method. Thanks for the inspiration!

  • Forget the rug, Laura (even though it is amazing), where the heck did you get those overalls?? I’m drooling over here!

  • SO CUTE! i want to go make one now!!
    http://wethinkthereforewecreate.blogspot.com

  • This looks amazing! I need to give this a go 🙂

    http://champagnelifestyleteabudget.blogspot.co.uk/

  • This rug is beautiful! Can you tell me how you plan to clean it? Thanks for sharing.

  • Uhhh! This looks amazing…. I need to do one of those maybe as a birthday present!
    Wonder if it would look good in color a few different color patterns? What do you think?

  • Well, if there was ever a time for me to learn how to sew I think making this cute rug would give me the incentive. I especially love how you can make it any size you want. I have been looking for a small, round rug for my tiny little bathroom and I love how you can make it any color. Now for a sewing machine….:)
    Thank you for sharing!

  • Silly question!. Where are Laura’s leather overall from? 😀

  • Are those leather overalls?! I love them! Where did you get them?
    (Nice work on the rug too 😉

  • It were beautiful! I loved! ❤️
    Congrats and aplauses of course! 😀

    Kisses
    Ana

    www.vanillathought.com

  • Hi Laura, this is beautiful! A question though, in your opinion, how do you think a beginner level sewer would do with this project? I’d love to give this a try!

  • Wow! I love it. I am been thinking about trying a project like this. Now I want to try it!

  • I loved everything, especially the black overalls!! Who made them? Thanks.

  • Such an easy and cool idea! It looks so stylish. Have to try it

    Lacebox.blogspot.com

  • This rug looks fabulous. It feels good to showcase something in your home you made yourself. I love the fabrics you chose because they really compliment the existing kitchen decor.

  • This is amazing!! What a great project! Thank you for showing how to do this. Your rug looks fantastic!

  • Wow what an amazing rug!

    In your opinion what would be the best sewing machine for someone just starting to sew??

  • I can just see mine now in blues and yellows to match my kitchen. this looks wonderful. thanks for the tutorial

  • Wow! now I want to make a rug!! I’ve got a Craft Gossip post that links to your tutorial:
    http://sewing.craftgossip.com/tutorial-fabric-rope-rug/2014/05/06/
    –Anne

  • Now I need to get a jean needle for my sewing machine. I wanted a nice area rug in our kitchen, and I wanted something I could do while watching/listening to tv, music and podcasts. Now that I found out what’s wrong with my sewing machine, I may give this a go! 🙂

  • LOVE the rug! After the first tutorial you mentioned, I’d hoped you’d do a circular one. Also, LOVE LOVE LOVE the shoes! Where’d ya get them?

  • I love the tutorial here but I also love your strappy black heels! Where are they from if I may ask?

    Thanks for the great DIY!

  • The rope is linked in the supplies but the fabric totally depends on if you have it already as scraps or how much it costs a yard, it can vary

    Laura 🙂

  • I just used regular all purpose cotton thread

    Laura 🙂

  • You can totally use a rug pad, I just haven’t gotten one yet for it…

    Laura 🙂

  • I did have to change a few needles, so I would keep extra around. It seemed to break if I was getting impatient and was sewing on too high a speed, but it’s normal for me to bend a few needles if I’m sewing heavy items

    Laura 🙂

  • Thanks for your help Alex, you’re the best!!

    Laura 😉

  • I used nine yards overall for a 55″ rug, so you’ll have to guess depending on what size you want. Use half for half that size, etc. 🙂

    Laura

  • this is seriously great! what a fantastic job.. so inspiring!
    xx

  • this is adorable! and i love your kitchen! those mint walls are perfect

    xxoo,
    nikki

    www.dreaminneon.blogspot.com

  • I love it! I’ve made weaving-type rugs that look similar before, but could never get those as large as I’d like them to be! This is amazing AND would be super cost effective vs. buying a rug the same size. Thanks for sharing!

    Just a side note: it would be really great if you’d share your sources when you’ve researched how to do new projects like this. It not only gives credit to those who’ve inspired projects, but would also help readers get even more ideas for their own variations.

    Great work Laura!

  • Wow, I can’t believe this looks so fabulous! You are really talented!
    http://fashion-soup.com/

  • AWESOME tutorial, thank you! Might try this for my new apartment 😀

    ♥ Cinnamon Girl ♥

  • Aw, this reminded me of the rugs my grandma used to make… It was a very common thing because most women made their own clothes and had plenty of fabric left overs to use. Brought back so many memories. x

  • i love your rug DIYs! i really wanna try them all as our house is mostly tiled so we get chilly toes!

  • Oh my god i LOVE it! Have to buy myself a sewing machine now..

  • What big work!!!

    http://inatrendytown.blogspot.com.es

  • I can definitely see this as a perfect student project – will look great brightening up college accommodation!

  • wow, I wish I can also make one 🙂
    thecertifiedlatebloomer.blogspot.com

  • This is sooo beautiful! ♥ Thank you so much for sharing!!

  • This is definitely the kind of project I love, something kind of mindless that does kind of take forever but with big impact. I’ve spent 6 hours sewing crepe paper that only lasted a few hours at a party, so I think this is doable for me. 🙂 Love it!

  • such a great tutorial. I love this style of rug and now I see no reason Not to make one! Thank you for the share =)

  • really amazing! it seems so affordable… I might try my hand in doing so!

  • OOOH you could also make chair pads in the same way and put ties on the back sides by making binding in a matching fabric !
    I love the rug and the whole idea!
    nancy from nancy’sfancys

  • WoW! This is pretty great! I also love her overalls with heels.

  • Well that’s amazing!
    you guys are very creative, I love that!
    http://www.jaseyjade.blogspot.com

  • Love this piece – thanks for all the tips

    www.nikitaandvesper.com

  • Ok wow, I’m seriously impressed. Absolutely gorgeous. Pinned for later.

    http://xfallenmoon.blogspot.ca/

  • This rug is awesome!! And I’m loving Laura’s posts lately!!

  • WOW! That is a DIY to be proud of! If I get ahold of some good fabric, I may try it this summer.

  • I need to make one for my daughter’s room! This is awesome. How much would you say you spent on all the supplies?

  • Yep, this is amazing. I would never have the patience (or time! blah) , but it’s just amazing!!

  • being a newbie to sewing, i have just put that on my to make list. Thanks for a fantastic step by step layout 🙂

  • Hi!! I have a rug of this sorts on my todo list. But I was wondering, what kind of thread did you use?? I want it to last and have had troubles in the past. Also an update on its durability would be wonderful 🙂

  • This is crazy cool. I am so impressed by how simple it is compared to what the final product.

  • I am glad to see this!! It is what I need to do now!!

    Great post as always
    http://top4addictions.com/
    http://top4addictions.com/

    Milee

  • This is gorgeous. I can not wait to revamp our kitchen with this technique, but I would also like to know if you’ve considered placing something under the rug to make it more cushy? I spend a lot of hours washing dishes (no dishwasher in Hawaii…but I live in Hawaii, tee hee so no complaints) and I think this rug could be fab under my feet! What would you suggest to add a little more comfort?

  • Um, where did you get those rad black overalls? I want a pair! The rug is FAB too!!!!!

  • The rug turned out great, Laura! I love that this is a project that you can put down, and then pick up again. I definitely think that you should experiment with making it bigger. 🙂

    -Helen Grace

    http://www.sweethelengrace.com

  • Amazing idea, thank you. I could try!

    http://weareatlove.com
    WEAR EAT LOVE

  • Such an amazing job! You are a talent with a sewing machine. Looks great 🙂

    www.dancingthroughsunday.typepad.com

  • I’m wondering how your sewing machine held up with all this. Did your needle ever break?
    Claire
    Hoopesparkstudios.com

  • YAY! It turned out great Laura! And looks awesome in your kitchen!

    -Alex

  • Wow this is so useful! All my old scraps of fabric can finally go to good use 🙂
    I will be sure to pass this on to my family, as I know they too would LOVE this!

    xoxo

    Brooke – from http://www.brookewrote.blogspot.com

  • About how much yardage do you think you used for a rug this size? I don’t have a scrap stash to speak of, so I’ll be buying some new fabric.

  • I didn’t have to mess with the machine tension, you just want the rug at the same height as the machine platform (keeping it flat while you sew is really important) and just not pulling or pushing the rope you are adding is the key. If you pull, you get a bowl, if you push, you’ll get a wave. But smaller waves can be ironed out, so you don’t have to be totally perfect 🙂

    Laura

  • Good question! We still really use most of what we make, but sometimes friends get the goods if we don’t have a place for something anymore 🙂

    Laura

  • Holy cow that rug looks amazing!!! And so do your fabulous heels, by the way 😉

    http://everydayingrace.blogspot.ca/

  • This is probably one of my favorite DIYs that has been featured on A Beautiful Mess yet! Unfortunately, it looks as thought it might be a bit too complicated for my beginner level skills! Still, bookmarking and might attempt this one day!

    rae of love from berlin

  • What a monumental project! Great work. It looks wonderful.

  • Ah, this is so cool! So much experimentation to be done! Love it <3

  • What a work!!! Congratulations Laura, it looks fantastic!!
    xoxo
    Melodie
    http://www.sevenlivesandmore.com/

  • The rug is amazing, I;m very happy with this tutorial!!

    xx Eveline from http://fragilityofbeauty.com/

  • I love this rug! Absolutely stunning and so impressive! I would love to make a (small) one for my own kitchen.

    xoxo
    Taylor

  • Just amazing! Absolutely worth the time. It’s so unique too. Love it!

  • Wow, I can’t believe how professional that rug looks!!!

  • I loooove these kinds of rugs! I always figured they’d be pretty easy to make, but just didn’t know how.

    Out of curiosity, what do you do with all your old DIY projects that don’t fit in with your current decor anymore? I have a problem with hoarding all my old creations and would love to know what y’all do with yours!

    http://cuddlyasacactus.wordpress.com/

  • That rug looks fab!!! Will totally try this! x

  • Coasters and hot pads for the table would be adorable in this too, and a great scrap-busting project!

  • I’ve been toying with making a rug and a bowl out of rope. This is exactly what I wanted to do. So would you say the looser you sew the better? I need all of the tips I can get before I get started, I’m a seasoned sewist but HATE ripping out seams. 🙂

  • I know this post is for the rug. It’s great! But where are your overalls from? I’m dying. They are amazing.

  • Wow, I really like that! I’m moving house soon and have a small budget for decorating so this came just at the right time!

  • another to add to my huge list of reasons I want a sewing machine!!!

  • I used that cross hatch print to cover some chair cushions in my living room and a B & W rug has been on my radar since then. I’ve thought about painting a rug but I love this one so much. It looks like such quality work, too. Great job! If I manage to get one complete this summer, I’ll let you know how it goes!

  • This is ahhhhhhh-mazing! I’m wanting to make a rug for our living room – this was the perfect inspiration. Thank you!!!

    Jessica

  • That’s beautiful and looks easy enough for me to attempt 🙂

  • This is awesome! I have a ton of scraps calling out to me now.

  • Love it! Not sure my sewing machine would cope with it, but I love the result! The possibilities with other materials are awesome!

  • This is such a beautiful rug! And such a beautiful kitchen, like everyone from the ABM team. I’d love to see a post on how to decorate and incorporate art into a kitchen. Thanks! 🙂

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