Miso Soup with Rice and Edamame

Miso Soup with Wild Rice and Edamame (via abeautifulmess.com)It’s been a few years since I first posted a Miso Soup recipe here on ABM. Time has passed, but nothing has changed, or at least my love of miso soup sure hasn’t! I must admit that I probably order miso soup out a lot more often than I make it at home. This has mostly to do with the fact that Trey’s favorite food is sushi. So if I’m angling to get a date night, I usually just mention sushi and it will happen. (I’m sneaky like that.) And we pretty much always get miso soup with our meal, especially during these cold winter months!

Miso Soup with Wild Rice and Edamame (via abeautifulmess.com) Miso soup is incredibly easy to make, and it’s the one soup that I always make my own stock for (called dashi). The ingredients for basic, made from scratch miso soup are few but can be a bit tricky to find depending on your grocery store situation. It’s such a simple dish though that there really aren’t any shortcuts to be found, and you won’t want any for that matter because it’s just such a comforting meal that is pretty healthy for you as well.

This meal starts off with my basic miso soup recipe and then gets a few other ingredients added so that it can easily stand on its own as a filling meal. Yum!

Miso soup ingredientsMiso Soup with Rice and Edamame, serves 2-3

1 cup wild or brown rice
1-2 strips kombu
2 1/2 cups water
2/3 cup bonito flakes
2 tablespoons miso paste
1 cup cooked edamame
1 tablespoon chopped chives or green onions
2-3 teaspoons finely chopped nori, optional

First, cook the rice according to the package directions. Or, if you’re lazy like me, in a rice cooker. 🙂

In a medium size pot, combine the kombu and water. Bring to a boil, then remove from heat. Use tongs to remove the kombu. Add in the bonito flakes and seep until they sink to the bottom (3-4 minutes). Strain out the bonito flakes. Now you have dash, and you’re ready to make your miso soup.

Miso Soup with Wild Rice and Edamame (via abeautifulmess.com) Once the rice is cooked, and still warm, stir the miso paste, rice, and edamame in to the dashi until everything is warmed through. Sprinkle on the chives and nori if using. Taste, and if you want, add some salt or soy sauce or any other seasoning you feel it needs. I like to keep this fairly simple myself as I really enjoy the taste of the miso paste in this soup.

Miso Soup with Wild Rice and Edamame (via abeautifulmess.com) Serve alongside some hot tea or maybe some hot sake if you’re feeling it. 🙂 Just a few notes here, and then I’ll leave you to make some soup so you can warm those winter fingers up… or is it just me who has perpetually cold hands January through March? Hmm.

Notes:

-I used a mix of brown and black (sometimes called forbidden) rice in the photos above because it’s what I had on hand. You can use any rice here, but I do recommend sticking to something whole grain (brown, wild, black, or even quinoa could be good) just so this meal stays extra good for you.

-When I use nori in recipes like this, I tend to “chop” it by cutting it into small pieces with kitchen shears as I’ve found that to be much easier since it’s such a brittle ingredient. You don’t want big pieces of nori floating in your soup since it packs a lot of flavor. A little goes a long way. Save the big pieces for when you make sushi. 🙂

-I used frozen edamame here and just allowed it to thaw in my refrigerator the day I wanted to use it. The frozen kind that doesn’t have a shell usually is already cooked, but if you can only find raw edamame, you may want to steam or cook it before adding to your soup like the directions state above.

Happy soup making! xo. Emma

Miso Soup with Rice and Edamame

Ingredients

  • 1 cup wild or brown rice
  • 1-2 strips kombu
  • 2 1/2 cups water
  • 2/3 cup bonito flakes
  • 2 tablespoons miso paste
  • 1 cup cooked edamame
  • 1 tablespoon chopped chives or green onions
  • 2-3 teaspoons finely chopped nori optional

Instructions

  1. First, cook the rice according to the package directions. Or, if you’re lazy like me, in a rice cooker.
  2. In a medium size pot, combine the kombu and water. Bring to a boil, then remove from heat. Use tongs to remove the kombu. Add in the bonito flakes and seep until they sink to the bottom (3-4 minutes). Strain out the bonito flakes. Now you have dash, and you’re ready to make your miso soup.
  3. Once the rice is cooked, and still warm, stir the miso paste, rice, and edamame in to the dashi until everything is warmed through. Sprinkle on the chives and nori if using. Taste, and if you want, add some salt or soy sauce or any other seasoning you feel it needs. I like to keep this fairly simple myself as I really enjoy the taste of the miso paste in this soup.

Credits // Author and Photography: Emma Chapman. Photos edited with A Beautiful Mess actions

  • I’m going to be a pest and point out a typo, you say “Now you have dash…” where you mean “dashi”. Might confuse people who aren’t familiar with dashi.

    Also, dried wakame seaweed is good instead of nori, has a slightly firmer texture which holds up better in the soup. If a store has Kombu and bonito, they probably have wakame too..Or there is always amazon.

  • Good question! Yes, it is fish, so not vegetarian friendly. I do not not but hopefully someone has an idea…

    -Emma

  • I used both. I used kombu for the dashi (the stock) and a little bit of nori on top of the final soup once the additional ingredients were added.

    You are correct, they are not the same. VERY different texture. But if you read the text then you’ll see that I’ve used both and not nori in place of kombu.

    -Emma

  • Since this is for umami factor the first two things that came to my head are dried shiriitaki mushroom or nutritional yeast. A mushroom based bouillon might do the trick too. The nutritional yeast less so as it more closely resembles chicken.

  • Anyone have a substitute for bonito? I’m guessing that’s fish? I need to make this vegetarian. Thanks guys.

  • Mmmmm. Perfect timing as my town has just been hit with freezing rain and miso soup is one of my cold weather staples. I like a cup in morning but am too lazy to add much. Rice and edamame sound like an easy and delicious addition.:)

  • This looks amazing! We’ll have to try this soon!

    Paige
    http://thehappyflammily.com

  • Um… no. Nori and kombu are not the same thing. You used nori. Kombu is much thicker and often used to make dashi (broth).

  • Ain’t no shame in the rice cooker game! 😉

    This looks so warm and hearty. Yum!

  • This is such a creative idea with wild rice!

    Charmaine Ng | Architecture & Lifestyle Blog
    http://charmainenyw.com

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